How to get hired on the spot graphic
HOW TO GET HIRED ON THE SPOT

You’ve done it; you landed that job interview. After all the resumé sprucing and cover letter writing, you finally got the call from HR and your first interview with your dream company is on the books. Now, it’s all about getting hired. Everyone, at some point in their life, will have to prepare for that uncomfortable and often intense meeting with a company they’ve applied to. But where do you begin? Here are some tips on how to get hired on the spot.

  1. TREAT YOUR INTERVIEW LIKE A SALES PITCH

Unless you’re actually in sales, the very concept of selling yourself can be daunting. You don’t want to sound arrogant or corny, or worse – desperate. But learning how to self-promote in a convincing manner is what the job interview is all about. Your interview is your chance to sell yourself and convince your interviewers of all the good you can do for the company. Interviews are not the time for modesty!

Have an elevator speech ready. Before you walk in the door, you should be ready with a short, punchy sentence or two that not only wraps up your skills, qualities and talents, but also entices the interviewer to listen to more of what you have to say. “You can’t create a single elevator pitch that will work for every audience,” says Anne Marie Segal a Connecticut-based executive coach at Stamford. “You have to be speaking to the pain points of the company.” After all, your goal is to present yourself as the solution to their problems.[1]

If you’re not especially comfortable talking about yourself, the job interview is going to feel much more awkward than it really needs to be. The key to finding your rhythm? Practice.

  1. DRESS FOR SUCCESS

When you feel good about the way you look, you naturally convey confidence and a positive attitude. These nonverbal messages are as important in the interview as the verbal skills you use in selling yourself. While there are no absolute rules, a good tip is to dress as you would if you were working at the company.

What you wear depends on what kind of interview it is and what it’s for. Keep in mind that it is always better to be overdressed than under dressed. If you are confused as to what to wear, don’t hesitate to ask. Call the person who scheduled you for the interview, or human resources to ask.

How you dress for an interview does make a difference. You’ve heard the saying, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” When it comes to a job interview, nothing rings truer. First impressions matter and dressing up shows that you actually put some effort. The first judgment potential employers will make, is based on how you look and what you are wearing. This is why it’s important to dress professionally for a job interview even when the work environment is a casual one.

  1. KNOW YOUR WEAKNESSES

A common job interview question you might get asked is, “What is your biggest weakness?” Even if you want to come across as the candidate to hire, no one is perfect, and trying to present yourself as such will put off the hiring manager.

So, just as you would keep track of your former glories, you should also have an example or two to present to a potential employer of things you need to work on. You can say something like, “In looking for a remote job, I’ve found that learning how to self-manage is very important. I’ve become much better at being able to meet all of my deadlines.” This doesn’t show failure, per se, but it does make you more human as you portray a weakness and how you’re working to make it better.[2]

“Hiring managers who ask about weaknesses during interviews are looking for examples of how a person faced obstacles in the past. Interviewers ask about weaknesses and failures because resiliency is a critical skill set which employees must have. As a manager, you expect to give constructive criticism to your employees and the ability of a person to take that and improve is important when choosing who you will manage.” says Dylan Schweitzer, a group talent acquisition manager for Enterprise Rent-A-Car.[3]

  1. BE PREPARED

The most important step to getting hired is being prepared for your interviews. By doing some preparation you’ll feel more in control, and will appear cool, calm and collected as a result to your prospective employers.

At the very least, have a look at the company’s website to familiarise yourself with their history and what they do. Showing that you’ve taken the time to learn about the business is always a good way to impress your interviewers. Look into developments in the industry as well, as this will show that you are engaged and clued-in.

Additionally, make sure you fully understand the duties of the role and what is expected. If the interviewer asks ‘what do you know about the role’ and you’ve not read it, it’s a sure-fire sign you’re unlikely to get hired! Also, by reading the job specs you can start to anticipate the questions the interviewer may ask and be better prepared to answer them.[4]

  1. SOLVE PROBLEMS

You won’t always be the most qualified candidate; however, you can still ace an interview by focusing on what skills you can bring to the role. Solving problems is an analytical skill that many employers look for when conducting interviews.

Managers would far rather hire a member of staff who can take action to resolve a problem than someone who doesn’t act and relies on someone else to think of a solution. Even if it isn’t outlined as a requirement in a job description, many employers will still be evaluating your problem-solving ability throughout the application and interviewing process. Effective problem solvers are those who can apply logic and imagination to make sense of the situation and develop a solution that works. Even if it doesn’t prove as successful as you had hoped, resilience is important, so you can reassess the situation and try an alternative.[5]

During the interview, you may be asked about times when you ran in to problems in the course of your work and how exactly you handled these situations. Potential employers aim to find out how you would handle future problems that may arise in the company. Always show that you are a quick thinker and are able to come up with innovative ways to deal with various issues.

Use these few tips to build your confidence and lay the foundation for a positive and influential interview. Remember that a job interview is not a test of your knowledge, but your ability to use it at the right time. So just go in and remember – you’re fantastic!

Feel free to email us your CV to keep on file incase we have the perfect position for you

If you end up landing that dream position, you’ll need to turn your focus to progressing up the ladder. Find out how to get promoted here.

Michelle Mshimba


[1]https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/sell-yourself-job-interview-hot-jobs 

[2] https://www.theladders.com/career-advice/how-to-sell-yourself-in-an-interview-without-being-an-egomaniac

[3] https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/02/19/how-to-talk-about-your-biggest-weakness-in-a-job-interview/#6cda44f05a80

[4] https://www.glurecruit.co.uk/candidate-advice/interviewing-for-a-job/importance-fully-prepared-interview/

[5] https://www.wikijob.co.uk/content/interview-advice/competencies/problem-solving

Title - Perks you can give your employees without breaking the bank - i
PERKS YOU CAN GIVE YOUR EMPLOYEES WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK

Employer brand is defined as the company’s reputation and popularity from a potential employee’s perspective. It describes the values the company gives to its employees[1]. Leaders quite often overlook their employer brand or devote few resources to develop and grow it. A strong employer brand attracts and retains workers while turning them into advocates for the company. Harvard Business Review estimates that a bad reputation costs companies at least 10% more per hire[2]. And according to Gallup, 51% of employees are actively looking for different jobs or watching for opportunities[3]. Organisations that ignore the need for employer branding will miss their chance to keep talented staff onboard.

In addition to the standard benefit packages (Health insurance, retirement fund contribution etc.), here are a few more suggestions to strengthen your employer brand:

  1. Experiences, Employee discounts, rewards and freebies

Your employees deserve some time-out after a particularly demanding week. Think movie tickets, meals or gift cards. Companies will commonly offer a monthly ‘rotating’ gift card to a local spa or restaurant wherein a different employee benefits each month.

  1. Flexible schedule

According to Gallup, a job that allows a greater work-life balance is “very important” to 53% of employees[4]. Allowing your employees some leeway to dictate their hours heightens their engagement with no cost to the employer. Depending on how you adopt the model, some companies set minimum working hours for their employees, while letting them arrange how to fit it into their day. For example, if I had an 8 hour work day, I might prefer to begin at 10 am and end it at 6pm. Whereas another employee might prefer to start at 7am and end 3pm.

  1. Wellness programmes

Employee health should be as big a concern for employers as it is to their subordinates. Unhealthy employees don’t perform – and if they do, they don’t fulfil their potential. Cost, time and responsibilities are the most common barriers inhibiting the pursuit of wellness. Companies can implement a range of measures to tackle this issue. Subsidising gym memberships, organising regularly scheduled walks after lunch and offering healthy snack options are a number of ways to achieve employee wellness. Our personal favourite is hiring a personal trainer for a group session, which is very cost effective while benefiting a larger number of employees.

  1. Generous paid time off

No doubt the topic of time off makes managers and employers very anxious. If that sounds like you, consider focusing on results, not output. If employees deliver on performance goals, does it make a difference how much time they spend at their desks? You’ll find when you trust employees to decide how much time to take off, they work harder to meet deadlines thus increasing productivity and efficiency.

  1. Improve the office environment

While we’re not urging you to invest in expensive extra curricular options, making an office more receptive to the people who spend ALL their time there will boost your bottom line. Consider adding free snacks, Apple Music/Spotify memberships or a comfortable break room to your office. Better yet, all three!

  1. Peer Recognition

While we may not like to admit it, acknowledgement of what we contribute is important to us. So why should it not be the same for our employees? Try having your employees offer a reward to a fellow employee of their choosing. Recognition goes a long way in fostering employee confidence and loyalty

  1. Career Development Opportunities

45% of millennials and 31% of Generation Xers say a job that accelerates their professional development is very important to them[5]. With the world literally at our fingertips, knowledge has been made readily accessible. It’s easier than ever before to learn new skills with platforms like Udemy and Edx. Encouraging employees to pursue the subsidised courses will likely increase their value to your organisation.

  1. Mental health days

Burnout is a reality for a lot of people. While your employees’ mental health should be incentive enough to provide mental health days, here’s more: Organisations with highly engaged employees outperform low engagement organisations financially by 202%[7]. It’s good business to provide space and time for your employees to reset when they ask for it.

  1. Commuter benefits

Unfortunately the rates at which cost of living is rising isn’t proportional to the rate at which salaries increase. This means people continue to earn less while their bills go up. Offering to help employees manage their costs in getting to work is a major perk they’d be interested in. Consider fuel allowances, public transportation budgets or even a company bus.

This list isn’t in any way exhaustive. There’s a lot more action organisations can take to build their employer brand. A great employer brand costs businesses 50% less per hire and results in 50% more qualified applicants[6]. No business wants to pay a premium in higher salaries because of a bad or non-existent reputation. Like any other aspect of your company, you must invest the required time and resources to reap the benefits.

Tune in Every Monday and Thursday for more tips and tricks.

Follow The Manpower Company on Facebook for even more insights.


[1] https://www.talentlyft.com/en/resources/what-is-employer-brand

[2] https://hbr.org/2016/03/a-bad-reputation-costs-company-at-least-10-more-per-hire

[3] State of the American Workplace, Gallup, 2017.

[4] State of the American Workplace, Gallup, 2017

[5] State of the American Workplace, Gallup, 2017

[6] https://business.linkedin.com/content/dam/business/talent-solutions/global/en_us/c/pdfs/ultimate-list-of-employer-brand-stats.pdf

[7] State of the American Workplace, Gallup, 2017

How to Fix your Companies Talent Problem
HOW TO FIX YOUR COMPANY’S TALENT PROBLEM
What is a healthy and productive workforce worth to you?

Whether you’re a budding entrepreneur or an established organisation we all undoubtedly share one particular challenge – growing the right team. Beyond question this gets trickier the more niche your market. While you may have all the dedication and get all the results, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. To remedy the lack of talent more and more companies are turning to remote workers aka telecommuters.

Economic strategy or workplace fad?

In all likelihood you’ve encountered countless trends, fads and instant-result solutions to your problems. Some overpromised their results, others flat out failed and maybe one actually worked. With the seismic growth of the Internet, pandemic prevention, congestion relief and even more factors, talk of remote work is growing. As Laurel Farrer, CEO of Distribute Consulting asks – is this particular trend economically justified or is it our evolving workforce craving modern convenience?[1] Well you know what they say, when in doubt – look at the numbers.

Sourcing information from Global Research Powerhouses – Stanford University, Gallup and Harvard University. Here’s what we found:

  1. Retention

In a survey, 54% of employees said they would switch to a job that offered them more flexibility. While, a further 54% said they were actively searching.[2] Further, an experiment conducted by Stanford, found that the attrition rate in employees who took up the opportunity to work from home more than halved compared to their office counterparts[3].

  1. Productivity

Remote workers are an average 20 -30% more productive than their office counterparts[4] and, another study revealed work output also increased 4.4% in teleworkers[5].

  1. Engagement

Gallup found 51% of the workforce was not engaged and this translated to a loss for companies[6]. Whereas remote workers had a greater return on engagement with a 41% reduction in absenteeism. Engaged workers produce 40% lower quality defects, 21% higher profitability and of course a 24-59% lower turnover[7].

  1. Performance

Remote workers showed a 13% performance increase in another study by Harvard. They attributed this increase to a reduction in break time and sick days in addition to a more comfortable work environment.[8]

  1. Profitability

The Chinese travel agency in a study, reported saving an average of $2,000 dollars a year per employee working remotely as a result of productivity boost and reduction in office space[9]. Further, Harvard noted that the average worker was willing to accept 8% less pay for the option to work from home and there is an effective increase in real salary without cost to the organisation –thanks to saving on commutes.

  1. Plenty of Fish

Lastly, remote workers offer you unflinching access to the best, qualified candidates in your market. Numbers are on your side and your options are limitless when hiring. You’d be fishing where the fish are.

Work place flexibility is no doubt a critical topic in the future of work, and employers who fail to consider it will renege on its benefit. If you believe remote work could be a key ingredient in your brand’s sustainability, you must invest in its development as a resource.

At The Manpower Company we dare to innovate, pioneer and evolve in the world of work. Outsourcing Human resources, relieves businesses of human resource management responsibilities thus allowing you to focus on what you do best. After all, isn’t it worth getting it right the first time?

What are your thoughts on workplace flexibility?

Follow us on Facebook at ‘TMC Kenya” for even more tips and tricks.

See you on Thursday for our next post.


[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurelfarrer/2020/02/12/top-5-benefits-of-remote-work-for-companies/#39d4b95216c8

[2] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx (pg. 169)

[3] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (pg 1)

[4] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (Pg 172)

[5] https://hbr.org/2019/08/is-it-time-to-let-employees-work-from-anywhere

[6] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx

(Page 61)

[7] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx (page 68)

[8] https://hbr.org/2019/08/is-it-time-to-let-employees-work-from-anywhere

[9] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (Page 170)

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