REASONS THAT HINDER EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP

Everybody thinks they’re a leader – most are far from it[1]. Like anything else, you can learn and practice effective leadership. While they are many paths to leadership, listed in this article are pitfalls ineffective leaders commonly find themselves in.

  1. You’re impassioned about your work and therefore your team.

“Becoming a leader is synonymous with becoming yourself. It is precisely that simple and it is also that difficult.” – Warren Bennis

Passion and zeal are infectious qualities and effective leaders know how to leverage them. By only focusing on the process rather than your team you fail to unlock the bond great teams share. It’s no secret that teams hit slumps quite often and impassioned leaders will find themselves frustrated. Frustration doesn’t run teams and neither do impassioned leaders. It’s you and your team against the world and not against each other.

  1. You’re not a role model

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”
-John Quincy Adams

Transformational leaders are greatly revered[2]. People want to be them, learn from them or work for them. An effective leader exemplify’s the behaviours and characteristics they encourage in their teams. As a result, people admire them and aim to replicate their behaviours.

If you want to become a better leader, work on modelling the qualities that you would like to see in your team members.

  1. You don’t listen thus communicate ineffectively

“When people talk, listen completely.” –Ernest Hemingway

You might have noticed that great leaders aren’t necessarily experts in their fields. Steve jobs was not a computer programmer, Elon musk is not an automotive engineer and Angela Merkel has a PhD in quantum chemistry. Leading is less about you’re acquired knowledge and more about getting people to apply theirs. Effective leaders communicate their visions to inspire their teams.

  1. You’re not clear about your expectations

“A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.” – Rosalynn Carter

Articulately communication your vision helps employees visualise the end goal. Your team can hardly track their progress if they don’t know where they’re headed. However, transformational leaders go beyond this and have their employees set clear goals serving the bigger vision. This way you can monitor progress and adjust their approach accordingly.

Ineffective leaders will usually expect their team to adopt an entirely proactive approach. This becomes a problem if one or more of them are unclear about your expectations therefore working towards a different goal.

  1. You don’t teach your team

“Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.” -John F. Kennedy

While your team should be made up of qualified professionals, developing their skills even further is characteristic of an effective leader. If people gain nothing from working with you, how can you expect their full commitment? Companies are continually growing so why shouldn’t their employees. Let’s not forget that developing employees results in higher engagement levels and added value to teams.

Effective leaders don’t just bark orders but encourage growth by teaching. Teaching is essential in growing new leaders to take your place.

  1. You don’t know your own motivation

“If you’re not sure where you are going, you’re liable to end up someplace else.” — Robert F. Mager

If a leader views their role as “just a job”, it’s going to show. To be an effective leader, you need the right motivation. Truthfully, you can hardly expect to lead your team if you can’t lead yourself. So just as you would find out what motivates your team, perform a thorough self -examination. Channel the result and tie this into your vision.

  1. You don’t nurture talent

“The function of leadership is to produce more leaders, not more followers.” –Ralph Nader

If you’re intimidated by the talent around you, you’ll tend to work against it. Real leadership serves as a talent magnet. If you don’t attract talent, you can’t develop it and retain it. You’re competition probably can.

  1. You don’t give credit, you take it

“There is no investment you can make which will pay you so well as the effort to scatter sunshine and good cheer through your establishment.” – Orison Swett Marden

Effective leadership is hardly about the trophies on your shelf. Leadership is not about seeking the spotlight, and it should never be about the recognition. True leadership is about elevating others for their contributions, rather than crediting yourself. You’ll get a lot more out of your team being liberal with praise than selfish with it.

  1. You don’t get results

“A leader is one who knows the way, goes the way, and shows the way.” –John Maxwell

This is probably the biggest indicator of ineffective leadership. Where-in poor performance is influenced by the above-mentioned factors. When evaluating your skills, your results are the best place to start. Communicate with your team and get their take on what you can improve.

Do note, results are not necessarily achieved with good leadership. If you get your results by abusing your influence, manipulating or bullying your team – you’re ineffective. The ends do not justify the means. You’re career as a leader will likely end sooner than expected if you place optics over ethics.

If you want to be a good leader, work your team to their strengths and motivate them with your vision. Results will follow.

Having outlined the characteristics of an effective leader, fill in your own gaps and aim to put your team first. Do it right and you’ll see your effort reflected in the results.

Thoughts?


[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikemyatt/2013/01/23/why-youre-not-a-leader/#1c5bde926fb8

[2] https://www.verywellmind.com/ways-to-become-a-better-leader-2795324#citation-2

How to Fix your Companies Talent Problem
HOW TO FIX YOUR COMPANY’S TALENT PROBLEM
What is a healthy and productive workforce worth to you?

Whether you’re a budding entrepreneur or an established organisation we all undoubtedly share one particular challenge – growing the right team. Beyond question this gets trickier the more niche your market. While you may have all the dedication and get all the results, a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. To remedy the lack of talent more and more companies are turning to remote workers aka telecommuters.

Economic strategy or workplace fad?

In all likelihood you’ve encountered countless trends, fads and instant-result solutions to your problems. Some overpromised their results, others flat out failed and maybe one actually worked. With the seismic growth of the Internet, pandemic prevention, congestion relief and even more factors, talk of remote work is growing. As Laurel Farrer, CEO of Distribute Consulting asks – is this particular trend economically justified or is it our evolving workforce craving modern convenience?[1] Well you know what they say, when in doubt – look at the numbers.

Sourcing information from Global Research Powerhouses – Stanford University, Gallup and Harvard University. Here’s what we found:

  1. Retention

In a survey, 54% of employees said they would switch to a job that offered them more flexibility. While, a further 54% said they were actively searching.[2] Further, an experiment conducted by Stanford, found that the attrition rate in employees who took up the opportunity to work from home more than halved compared to their office counterparts[3].

  1. Productivity

Remote workers are an average 20 -30% more productive than their office counterparts[4] and, another study revealed work output also increased 4.4% in teleworkers[5].

  1. Engagement

Gallup found 51% of the workforce was not engaged and this translated to a loss for companies[6]. Whereas remote workers had a greater return on engagement with a 41% reduction in absenteeism. Engaged workers produce 40% lower quality defects, 21% higher profitability and of course a 24-59% lower turnover[7].

  1. Performance

Remote workers showed a 13% performance increase in another study by Harvard. They attributed this increase to a reduction in break time and sick days in addition to a more comfortable work environment.[8]

  1. Profitability

The Chinese travel agency in a study, reported saving an average of $2,000 dollars a year per employee working remotely as a result of productivity boost and reduction in office space[9]. Further, Harvard noted that the average worker was willing to accept 8% less pay for the option to work from home and there is an effective increase in real salary without cost to the organisation –thanks to saving on commutes.

  1. Plenty of Fish

Lastly, remote workers offer you unflinching access to the best, qualified candidates in your market. Numbers are on your side and your options are limitless when hiring. You’d be fishing where the fish are.

Work place flexibility is no doubt a critical topic in the future of work, and employers who fail to consider it will renege on its benefit. If you believe remote work could be a key ingredient in your brand’s sustainability, you must invest in its development as a resource.

At The Manpower Company we dare to innovate, pioneer and evolve in the world of work. Outsourcing Human resources, relieves businesses of human resource management responsibilities thus allowing you to focus on what you do best. After all, isn’t it worth getting it right the first time?

What are your thoughts on workplace flexibility?

Follow us on Facebook at ‘TMC Kenya” for even more tips and tricks.

See you on Thursday for our next post.


[1] https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurelfarrer/2020/02/12/top-5-benefits-of-remote-work-for-companies/#39d4b95216c8

[2] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx (pg. 169)

[3] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (pg 1)

[4] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (Pg 172)

[5] https://hbr.org/2019/08/is-it-time-to-let-employees-work-from-anywhere

[6] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx

(Page 61)

[7] https://www.gallup.com/workplace/238085/state-american-workplace-report-2017.aspx (page 68)

[8] https://hbr.org/2019/08/is-it-time-to-let-employees-work-from-anywhere

[9] https://nbloom.people.stanford.edu/sites/g/files/sbiybj4746/f/wfh.pdf (Page 170)

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